The Most Epic Guide to Online Coding Bootcamps, Ever

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Coding bootcamps didn’t exist several years ago. Now, in 2016, they’re a multi-million dollar industry.

What makes coding bootcamps unique is that they generally come at a higher price tag. They are also more intensive than self-guided learning sites like Codecademy or Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) like edX.

Aside from in-person bootcamps, there are now online coding bootcamps which bring that intense classroom environment online.

I’ve received numerous questions from readers asking about online bootcamps and what my thoughts are on them.

But… I never finished an online coding bootcamp myself.

So, I made it my mission to research some of the most popular bootcamps on the market, talk with some “graduates”, and see what they thought of them.

Table of Contents

Because this piece is a massive beast (of helpful information), I created a little table of contents so you can easily move around. Simply click one of the bootcamps to jump ahead.

But First: Why an Online Bootcamp?

More specifically: Who should consider attending an online bootcamp?

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Co-Founder of Course Report Liz Eggleston shines some light on this topic:

“Online bootcamps aren’t MOOCs; they’re structured, mentor-guided learning platforms that attempt to mirror the experience of in-class education. This means that you should expect to commit a good chunk of time to your class (between 5-20 hours per week), but does not mean that experience is necessary to succeed. Almost all online programs accept beginners and offer several course options catered to your experience level (ie. Intro to HTML/CSS, Front-End, or Full-Stack).

moocs vs bootcamps

If you have a unique background or are a bit more experienced, be sure to ask the school’s admissions team if there is enough advanced content for you to benefit from the course.

While online bootcamps can be a great fit for any level of experience, students who have pinpointed their goals and motivations for learning to code may be more successful.

Why do you want to do an online coding bootcamp? If your goal is to change careers or get a technical job, then be sure you can commit 20 to 40 hours to the curriculum and outside work. If you’re taking the course to build Liz, Co-Founder at Course Reportyour own app or company, be sure your mentor is able to adapt the course to your needs. For example, you may need to learn a bit of Node.JS even though the curriculum is front-end focused. Having a clear goal in mind will help you mentally commit to the course.”

– Liz Eggleston, Co-Founder of Course Report @coursereport

What Should You Think About Before Signing Up?

Again, back to Liz:

“Before you sign up:

  • Ask to review the bootcamp’s curriculum or even ask for a free trial (Skillcrush gives a free 10-day intro course, Bloc is open with their curriculum, etc)
  • Know how much time you can devote to learning. Does the course cost make sense for your time commitment?
  • How long will you have access to the course materials: do you have to finish in 3 months? Can you put your course on hold or extend it?
  • How many mentor sessions are guaranteed each week? Will you have access to your mentor outside of those designated sessions?
  • Is it important that you can choose your mentor?
  • How much access do you want to have with other students in the community?”

Basically: know your personal goals, preferences, and how the given bootcamp will be able to meet them.

An In-depth Look at 9 Online Coding Bootcamps

Online Coding Bootcamp #1: Bloc

Price: Varies (see below)
Duration: Varies (see below)

Official website

Description: Bloc is the world’s largest online bootcamp. You can learn at your own pace, develop apps with real-world use cases and communicate with a mentor on a weekly basis. Aside from specialized courses Bloc also offer two tracks: software engineering and full stack web development. Tracks cost significantly more than courses and involve a greater time commitment.

Tracks: 

  • Software Engineering ($24,000, 48-144 weeks in duration)
  • Full Stack Web Developer ($9,500, 24-72 weeks in duration)

Specialized courses:

  • Rails Web Development
  • Frontend Web Development
  • UX/UI Design
  • Android Development
  • iOS Development

Price: $4,999

Duration: 12-36 weeks

Lauralee, Bloc participantBloc Previous Student Insight: Lauralee Flores

Website: lauraleeflores.com

Program Completed: Full Stack Development

Reasons for choosing Bloc:

“I was familiar with other bootcamps and had always wanted to attend them but they either required that I be physically present at their location or the curriculum wasn’t challenging enough – I wanted something remote but still challenging.

I also chose Bloc because I got to work with a Bloc mentor one-on-one. After starting the program I was surprised at how much time I got with the mentor each week. It was a very pleasant surprise!

The reason that ultimately led me to choose Bloc was that I got to work one-on-one with a mentor on a capstone project of my choosing. I had been working on majorfinder.com for a while and together we created a personality test. I have since expanded it and am about release it on majorfinder.com/personality.”

Who do you think the program would be good for?

“I feel like the program is good for anyone who is willing to work. It starts out easy and gradually gets harder. There’s a mentor there with you every step of the way so if you ever need help there’s someone there to help you. And if you’re a more advanced programmer you can fly through the easier stuff and get into more advanced rails projects. Regardless of where you’re at when you begin, Bloc will challenge you and allow you grow and improve.”

Head back to the table of contents »

Online Coding Bootcamp #2: CareerFoundry

Price: $1,899
Duration: 3 to 6 months

Official Website

Description: By the time you complete a program at CareerFoundry, you will have completed two web apps, a portfolio, and CV. You also will have had at least 12 sessions with a mentor to help guide your education, who is available to help whenever you need it.

Available Courses:

  • Web Developer
  • UX Designer
  • UI Designer
  • iOS Developer (coming soon)

Sam, previous student at Career FoundryCareerFoundry Previous Student Insight: Samuel Boguslawski

Website: samuelboguslawski.com

Program completed:  Full Stack Web Development

Reasons for choosing CareerFoundry:

“I started teaching myself web programming a while ago and tried many things like Codecademy, Treehouse, Code School, Udemy and The Odin Project. With the first four websites my main problem was the missing complete curriculum. I was looking for something where I could learn everything I need to know in a right order without having to learn through many different tutorials here and there. I wanted to be guided through a proper learning plan…

That’s why I found The Odin Project – which is an awesome website! The only problem with that one was, that when you get stuck you don’t have someone to ask. You also really have to motivate yourself to stay on track and keep the learning up.

That’s why I started looking for paid solutions. Because I knew if I pay for something I am gonna force myself to really put time and effort into it.

I looked at many different courses like Bloc.io or Viking Code School…even online universities. But in the end my main reason to choose CareerFoundry was the price. None of the other courses were nearly as affordable.”

Who do you think the program would be good for?

The program at CareerFoundry is perfect for people who want to get a general idea of web development and a deeper insight into back-end programming with Ruby on Rails. It is not for people who want to learn mainly about front-end, JavaScript, etc. because the JavaScript part of the curriculum is very short (at the moment) – but they are extending their curriculum all the time.”

Head back to the table of contents »

Online Coding Bootcamp #3: Designlab

Price: Varies (see below)
Duration: Varies (see below)

Official Website

Description: Designlab is unlike the others on the list. This bootcamp focuses on design more than coding. Aside from individual courses, they also have a more in-depth program, UX Academy, that is intended to prepare you for a career in UX design. It is more detailed than regular courses and comes with a job preparation component.

Available program: UX Academy ($2,799 up front OR $2,999 paid in 3 or 6 monthly installments, 12-44 weeks in duration)

Single classes:

  • Design 101
  • Typography (coming soon)
  • Branding
  • UX Research & Strategy
  • Interaction Design
  • Prototyping & Testing (coming soon)

Price: $299

Duration: 4-6 weeks

Alexa, previous DesignLab Student

Designlab Previous Student Insight: Alexa Denner

Twitter: @AlexajaneDen

Program completed: Design 101

Reasons for choosing Designlab:

“I chose to go with Designlab because I had heard of another Designlab student who went from a completely nonexistent graphic designer to a proficient one in 6 weeks and without learning photoshop! Inspired, I signed up and learned everything using the platform Sketch to design. I know how to use Photoshop, but I found Sketch was a more comprehensive platform and enabled me to keep up with the coursework by being simpler to use. The mentor I had was an insanely talented CTO, head graphic designer, and founder of his company. I was so lucky to find Designlab, and I can’t believe the experience I had. I would recommend it to everyone.”

Who do you think the program would be good for?

“Now that I have completed Designlab I believe I have enough experience and skill (plus a portfolio) to apply for the Graphic Designer positions I had previously aspired to fill. I’m currently freelancing as a graphic designer and able to practice and perfect the skills Designlab had already begun to foster for me. This course is essential for any artist who wants to get the tools to learn how to innovate themselves in the digital world. The skills I have acquired through my Designlab course made me more marketable and far happier in my new work life.”

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Online Coding Bootcamp #4: Firehose Project

Price: $4,000 upfront or five monthly payments of $900
Duration: 15 weeks

Official Website

Description: Firehose Project offers a free two-week precourse to learn basic HTML, CSS, and core Ruby concepts. You can then move on to the full course after that period.

Available Program: Full-stack Web developer (Firehouse Core)

Brant, previous student at FirehoseProjectFirehose Project Previous Student Insight: Brant Wellman

Website: co-de-pendency.com

Twitter: @brantwellman

Reasons for choosing Firehose Project:

“The two biggest reasons I went with the Firehose Project over other online coding bootcamps were 1) the group project that you end up being a part of during the curriculum and 2) the fact that they teach you algorithms in addition to how to build web applications. No other online bootcamp that I researched offered either of these things in their curriculum and I felt like they were both going to help me become a better coder and stand out from the pack in interviews for Jr Web Development positions.”

Who do you think the program would be good for?

“When I went through the program, it was advertised as something that you could do in 10-15 hours / week for the length of the program. However, if you have more time to put into it, you will get more out of it. I spent an average of at least 30 hours per week working on the program, and I still feel like if I had put more time into it, my Mentor would have easily filled that time with more things to learn. If you have a basic understanding of HTML and CSS already as well, you will get more out of the program as you won’t be slowed down by needing to understand these languages. Ideally, you are someone that already has some basic understanding of HTML and CSS and you have as much time available to throw at the program as you possibly can.”

Head back to the table of contents »

Online Coding Bootcamp #5: Launch School

Price: $199/month
Duration: Self-paced (but most students finish in 6-12 months)

Official Website

Description: The Launch School online program teaches technologies and programming languages that don’t change. The idea is that when you master the fundamentals of programming first, you can easily learn any programming language in the future. Launch School is for serious learners only; those that want to make a complete career transition. Learn more about Launch School in this LTCWM podcast interview where I chat with the founder, Chris Lee.

Available program: The Slow Path to Proficiency

Perry Carbone - Former Launch School StudentLaunch School Previous Student Insight: Perry Carbone

Website: perrycarbone.github.io

Reasons for choosing Launch School:

“I chose Launch School for its pristine reputation, it’s cost to value ratio, the thoroughness it provides in the material it teaches, and its focus on fundamentals and first principles. There is simply no other bootcamp out there that provides all of these things in spades like Launch School does. Another big factor was that it was online and self-paced. As a career changer, part time musician and husband and father of three, I needed the flexibility to accomplish the transition on my own terms while juggling the other priorities in my life. Launch School provides the perfect balance – its flexible while being fully supported. And their mentoring program (which I participated in) guarantees job placement if you are willing to work really hard and not give up.”

Who do you think the program would be good for?

“This program is perfect for serious beginners who are not just looking for any job, but top level engineering jobs in the industry. If you are willing to work very hard, put the time in and be fully committed to the process, Launch School will guide you all the way to the finish line.”

Head back to the table of contents »

Online Coding Bootcamp #6: Learn Verified

Price: $1500/month (financing available)
Duration: Self-paced (but most students finish in 4-9 months)

Official Website

Description: Learn Verified offers an online curriculum for becoming a Full Stack Web Developer. During the course of the program you will complete over 700 lessons, have access to study groups, and receive career training. The program instructs Ruby on Rails.

Available program: Full Stack Web Development

Ziv Zamechek - Learn.co student testimonialLearn Previous Student Insight: Ziv Zamechek

Website: ziveloper.com

Reasons for choosing Learn.co:

“I chose Learn Verified because it is part-time program that can run around my schedule, great networking, and guarantee job. They have many TA’s that respond very quickly, and Avi is a great teacher really take his time to help when needed. Tried out the pre-course and really enjoyed learning and becoming part of a friendly community.”

Who do you think the program would be good for?

“Learn Verified is a great bootcamp for anybody who is seeking a career as developer and for those who want to learn programming at their own convenient time especially for those who have jobs they want to keep.”

Head back to the table of contents »

Online Coding Bootcamp #7: Skillcrush

Price: Depends on course (read more below)
Duration: 3-4 or 11 weeks

Official Website

Description: Catered to people who want to switch careers into the digital world. They don’t just have courses; they have career blueprints. And single classes for those who want to learn one specific topic.

Career Blueprints:

  • Web Designer
  • Web Developer
  • Front End Developer
  • Mobile Web Designer
  • Freelance WordPress Developer
  • Ruby on Rails Developer

Price: 3 monthly payments of $149 or a full payment of $399

Duration: 11 weeks

Single Classes:

  • UX & Web Design
  • HTML & CSS
  • JavaScript & jQuery
  • Introduction to WordPress
  • Ruby, Git & The Command Line

Price: $175

Duration: 3 to 4 weeks

Debbie, a previous Skillcrush studentSkillcrush Previous Student Insight: Debbie Labedz

Website: bibliofille.com

Twitter: @bibliofilleblog

Programs completed:

  • Skillcrush 101: HTML & CSS (3 week course)
  • Freelance WordPress Developer course (3 month course)
  • Beginning Skillcrush 102: JavaScript & JQuery (3 week course)

Reasons for choosing Skillcrush:

“They know their niche and they execute well within it: 25-35 year old women looking to change careers to something tech-related. That was me in a nutshell. Their content was broken down into easily digestible chunks, often following a tight sequence of short video, chunk of content, an exercise, and a review. It was clear that they had invested in the pedagogical aspect of learning to code rather than just throwing a bunch of terms and concepts at you, but it still had a fresh tone that didn’t feel stuffy or academic.

The lessons often included cheat sheets, worksheets, exercises, and little quizzes to make the experience more interactive and make sure the concepts really stuck. All of their classes offer access to a Mightybell chat group where you could ask questions, connect with other classmates, offer and get support. That was a big selling point for me. I knew I wouldn’t feel alone in this program. I also loved that they offer lifetime access to the courses you take. I still reference lessons from the class I took over a year ago when I’m developing sites now.”

Who do you think the program would be good for?

“I think their individual courses are best suited for beginners, perhaps beginner-intermediate developers. They offer career-focused tracks for tech roles such as web designer, web developer, and freelance WordPress developer where the tech content is nicely mixed with job searching/freelancing strategies. Their programs are perfect for those who are early on in their journey toward a career change.”

* Full Disclosure: I sometimes write for Skillcrush.

Head back to the table of contents »

Online Coding Bootcamp #8: Thinkful

Price: Varies (see below)
Duration: Varies (see below)

Official Website

Description: Thinkful is more established than the others (since 2012). They have a stronger emphasis on one-on-one mentorship and also will review your resume after each course is completed. With Thinkful, you only pay for the months you need. Thinkful has a full-stack bootcamp as well as individual courses in particular areas.

Available Program: Part-time Bootcamp ($1,400/month, from 6 months)

Individual courses:

  • Frontend Web development
  • Programming in Python
  • Web Development in Rails
  • Frontend in AngularJS
  • Backend in Node.js
  • Modern Web Design
  • User Experience Design
  • Data Science in Python
  • iOS Programming in Swift
  • Android Development

Price: $300-500/month

Duration: 3 months or more, depending on hours spent studying each week

Zak, former Thinkful student Thinkful Previous Student Insight: Zak Cagaros

Website: expresstuts.com

Program completed: Frontend Web Development

Reasons for choosing Thinkful:

“The main reasons behind my decision to go with Thinkful was its flexibility in doing a course at my own pace without having to make other sacrifices. I run my own training company, so this was ideal for me as it enabled me to learn part-time whilst continuing what I was doing. The other main factor that helped me decide was the number of projects that you get to work on and working with an experienced mentor. The projects are closely aligned with what is expected in a real world situation, and this, in my opinion, is the best way to learn to code.”

Who do you think the program would be good for?

“I think the program would be ideal for any developers that want to learn front end skills, and in particular beginners that would like to have a good foundation that they can build on further. Also, I think this course would serve as a nice prerequisite before taking a full immersive hands-on bootcamp course.

Since starting the course, Thinkful have increased the cost of all of their courses to $500, and now that I have gone through the entire course I believe that this is overpriced, given that they do not actually give you any resources. However, if the main priority is to get the time of an experienced mentor to help you to complete your projects then I think it’s definitely worthwhile, but in terms of the course curriculum and the learning resources, you can easily get [those] for free elsewhere.”

Head back to the table of contents »

Online Coding Bootcamp #9: Viking Code School

Price: No tuition, but all participants pay a $2,000 deposit and 18% of first year’s salary*
Duration: 16 weeks

Official Website

Description: Viking Code School gives you a real-world experience by grouping students into teams, developing real-world projects. A big difference from the rest of this group is that they offer tuition deferment until after you get your first development job.

Available Program: Full-Stack Developer program

* Must qualify for this option. And if unable to find job within 6 months, Viking Code School will reimburse you. 

Michael, prior Viking Code School studentViking Code School Previous Student Insight: Michael Alexander

Twitter: @m_w_alexander

Reasons for choosing Viking Code School:

“I had fallen in love with Ruby and web development while pursuing it as a hobby, and this interest of mine had suddenly blossomed into a serious career goal. I was a huge fan of the Viking founder’s previous free offering, the Odin Project, and I meshed very strongly with that style of teaching and presentation — my hopes were for more of the same, but going deeper and with a whole lot more one-on-one feedback and practice building things as a team with other people. I wanted a way to get as fully immersive a program as I possibly could without going into $18k debt up-front on top of making an exit from my job, and the remote aspect also appealed to me.”

Who do you think the program would be good for?

“Now that I’ve finished, I have a lot of ideas about who this course is good for. I think it’s for people who really want a deep, complete full-stack boot camp experience, who aren’t looking to just learn a little code on the side, but for some reason don’t see in-person boot camps as an option. That reason could be geography (maybe you’re in Montana, like one Viking student I’ve worked with extensively), because of money (the deferred tuition might really help you), or because in-person lectures just aren’t your favorite learning style— Viking has you doing a WHOLE lot of reading in between the demos and discussions, and is more heavy on text than many online programs I’ve seen.

If you want to work remotely, but you want to be pushed HARD, Viking is a very strong option.”

* Full Disclosure: After completing the course, Michael now works for Viking Code School.

Head back to the table of contents »

A special thanks to all the participants who made this guide possible!

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Additional Resources on Online Coding Bootcamps:

Online Bootcamps Offer Flexible, Affordable Learning at Your Convenience

In the end, coding bootcamps are starting to act as a supplement to college education. Even Ivy League graduates sign up for them. The industry is only growing, online and offline.

With all the options available—ranging in price, duration, and intensity—there’s something for everyone. However, it’s important to do your research and consider exactly what you want to get out of the bootcamp before signing up.

Each of these bootcamps offer different things, for different people. So reflect on what is important to your future, and how you learn best before making a final decision.

Have a friend who is thinking about doing a coding bootcamp, too? Click here to email this article to them.


  • Snovi

    awesome! did anyone got the job after finishing the school?

    • That’s a great question!

      I know Zak has his own company. I am not 100% but I believe Debbie does freelancing/consulting. And Lauralee has the site http://majorfinder.com/.

      If you noticed, Viking has heavy-duty career prep stuff. They actually will give students a refund if they do NOT get a job within 6 months. So I would assume many Viking grads get full-time jobs following.

      Next time I’ll have to ask a 3rd question: “How did the coding bootcamp help you move forward in your career?”

      • Mood

        Hi Laurence,

        Nice blog, I’ve subscribed to it. I can speak anecdotally but Hack Reactor has an online program that is equivalent to the on-campus one in San Francisco. My younger brother just completed the program (he was my guinea pig :D ) and said he would have preferred the online one for the convenience, and money saved from living expenses.

        The second program I would recommend is freecodecamp.com . I think I found your blog actually because you had mentioned switching from Ruby on Rails to Javascript, and I think your reasoning is sound.

        I personally have been doing The Odin Project, and found the lack of updates to be a little underwhelming (since the creator has switched attention to Viking boot camp), but importantly, Javascript development is a better market to be in.

        See: http://www.arshaan.me/why-i-switched-from-the-odin-project-to-freecodecamp/

        http://blog.freecodecamp.com/2014/10/the-real-reason-to-learn-mean-stack.html

        https://medium.com/@learntocodewithme/3-regrets-i-have-so-far-as-a-self-taught-coder-dc299f7ec4b2

        So my plan is to more or less put in about 800 hours into freecodecamp.com’s curriculum (800/1600 hours foregoing the last 800 hours for the projects) which is where I’ll likely start the online Hack Reactor course. It’s expensive, but the connections, and reputation are second to none for boot camps. Probably worth the extra 5-6,000$, plus in the unlikely event one can’t get a job, they too can get a refund like with Viking boot camp.

        The two most important take home messages people should be taking are: 1) to be doing something you are interested (duhhh) but probably more relevantly 2) getting into the industry as soon as possible to build experience and also to make money sooner. As an opportunity cost, every month not working in the industry is a month lost of income, so if a boot camp can get one there sooner rather than doing it over a year, or two, or three even (yes, freecodecamp.com’s curriculum has plans for doing it over 3 years), that’s a tremendous amount of potential income that is being lost.

        ~
        Mood

        • Hey Mood,

          Thanks for readings and providing such insights. I was not aware that Hack Reactor now has an online version of their course — very cool. If I do another guide next year, I will make sure to include them in the bunch :) (And maybe you can be the one to provide the insight…if you end up doing the course!)

          I was aware of free options like the two you listed, Odin and Free Code Camp, but I made the decision to stick with programs that were not free. And instead provided more premium features like one-on-one mentorship, career guidance, etc.

          Thanks for sharing those links: about http://blog.freecodecamp.com/2014/10/the-real-reason-to-learn-mean-stack.html — I agree that JS on the front and backend will be increase in popularity…and be more employable.

          And yes: the sooner one gets some “real-world” experience (whether that be full-time, part-time, contract, freelance, etc), the better. Having a Github account, having a portfolio, having recommendations, etc is all very important =) Much more so than completing 50 online courses…with nothing to show.

          Thanks for reading and sharing all the articles!

          PS – the last article you shared — https://medium.com/@learntocodewithme/3-regrets-i-have-so-far-as-a-self-taught-coder-dc299f7ec4b2 — you realize is mine, right? haha. (on Medium!)

          • Mood Shake

            Yeah your article with Gob from Arrested Development, in addition to Arshaan’s ( http://www.arshaan.me/why-i-switched-from-the-odin-project-to-freecodecamp/ ), who quite literally changed a couple of weeks ago from TOP as well, is what motivated me to make the switch from TOP to FCC. My original plan was to use the TOP material’s as a “foundation” for Hack Reactor’s curriculum, but then realized FCC’s superior since it’s regularly maintained, has a chat room, and quite possibly the only free online javascript-oriented boot camp that can turn one into a full stack developer.

            Joshua Kemp is another great blog writer who compares some of the bootcamps as well and you may find it useful: http://joshuakemp.blogspot.com/p/coding-bootcamps.html

            Regarding Hack Reactor, if I remember correctly, they advertise themselves as a “60 – 120 MPH” program versus the others that are “0 – 60”; I think they are successful in starting people out as full stack developers, rather than as junior developers which is a big plus in my book.

            The one possible downside (if you want to call it that) with Hack Reactor is that it’s very intense i.e. 80 – 100 hour weeks, so if you fall behind, it can be hard to catch up. My brother who has no CS background, just biology, and one of the younger students in his cohort, found it very challenging and at times stressful, but fortunately extremely worthwhile in the end. In a way, the pressure turns you from coal to diamond. The important thing he kept on emphasizing was that the on-campus one was no different or better than the online one (and it’s what motivated me to forgo the on campus one). Here’s his team’s project, btw, and you can see what can be accomplished from scratch to profiency in 3 months:
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ryEown2Fyfw

            http://www.hackreactor.com/blog/student-team-creates-user-friendly-music-looping-app.

            Regarding free boot camps like FCC, they’re nice because they’re well free, allow you to go at your own pace, and quite often work for people who don’t qualify for loans, work a full time job, or live outside the US (and have visa issues).

            However, I think you are right that when you’re in a paid curriculum, and you have a debt possibly between $10,000 – $20,000, it puts more psychological pressure on you to finish the course to completion which is a downside with free material (I think completion rates are typically like 5-10% for MOOCs which is pretty low imo). There is also a tendency for people to slack off or not care as much when something is “free” (water is free too but is arguably the most valuable resource we have in the world). What I’ve found personally was that I like to teach myself, but without deadlines (whether financial or academic), I don’t go all the way. Plus interacting with people (whether online or in person) is a great motivator.

          • I’ve heard good things about Hack Reactor and Dev Bootcamp. But $20,000 dollars is a bit much. I guess it does encourage people to complete the course compared to MOOC.

            Can you really fail an online bootcamp?

          • Mood Shake

            I’ve heard so/so things about Dev Bootcamp. Hack Reactor & App Academy were the two that stood out from the rest, and I think Coding Dojo was high quality as well (Bay Area as least). I know there were a couple others that had developed a quality reputation, but I can’t remember then from the top of my head right now.

            I think practically everyone does well in these programs, since they’re extremely hard to get into (Hack Reactor & App Academy are like 5 – 10 % admission rate, so you have to really want it if you’re going to do it), but I believe that in the cases a student is struggling they will ask them to leave, and also offer them a refund as well. They’re not looking to destroy anyone’s life which would be bad PR imo.

            That said, you can’t fail them since there’s no grade, but you get out of the programs what you put into them – and that reflects when it comes to the job search.

          • I think it’s really smart that bootcamps (especially the pricey ones) make it hard to get in. It cuts out the bottom feeders.

            It also means the success rates of graduates will be higher. If a person works that hard to get in, pays that much, they are most likely going to get awesome jobs. Which then makes the bootcamp itself look good. It’s a total win.

          • I feel like you can’t really “fail” any bootcamp: online or offline. But as Mood says below… you get what you put in.

          • Hey — thanks again for all this helpful info! Wow.

            I only ever looked into going to an in-person coding bootcamp once. I actually began the interview process. But (luckily) did not commit.

            It taught RoR (which I do nothing with nowadays, and am happy about that), was $$$, and was located in a city that was $$$. I would have spent 20K I bet by the end. Considering relocation, food, rent, etc.

            So…I am very happy I dodged that…haha. I had only been teaching myself to code for about 2 months at the time. Not long enough to know what I “really” wanted.

            Anyway: that video of your brother is awesome :-) Very impressive. And the whole group looks quite young!

            Also with the in-person, and I guess some of the online ones that are more time intensive, a lot of people (like me) can’t commit that much time a week!

            Thank goodness there are part time options — offline and online. =)

            But 100% in agreement: when you pay for something, you value it more. The more you pay, the more you value it. If I were paying 2K for a bootcamp versus 15K — I’d bust my butt in the 15K one. Whereas with the former…may be more relaxed about completing it.

          • Mood Shake

            Actually I think most of them were in their late 20s. The guy who was horribly singing the Awimbawe song was like 33 I believe, & one of the Asians, a Brown graduate, and 30. My brother was only 23, and I think the average age is around 27 – 28. But I guess video makes people look younger (which is why they cast older actors for younger roles a la Will Smith in Fresh Prince of Bel-Air who was like 27 for a 17 year old going to college lol). There were a lot of highly qualified people in the class, electrical engineer, some hot shot phd, and my bro who went to a “No Name” state school, but it shows you that it can be done, and that pedigree alone doesn’t matter as much as discipline, and work ethic.

            There were a lot of times my bro felt like he wasn’t up to par with other students, but overall he did just fine. That said, I think in CS there tends to be a significant degree of impostor syndrome where you feel everyone else knows way more than you do, but it’s a common feeling I think.

            Btw, have you ever thought about long term prospects in this field? Demand is through the roof for the foreseeable future, but I wonder where things could be 10, 20, 30, or even 40 years down the road.

            That said, I think, once one gets their feet wet, taking actual CS coursework would be helpful and invaluable. I know for me personally, I would like to enter a bigger company **at some point down the road**, and I think having a CS degree (either bachelor’s or master’s) may be useful and/or “necessary.” There’s a good thread on reddit going on right now: http://www.reddit.com/r/cscareerquestions/comments/36w1ao/bootcampmoocs_programmers_and_animosity/crhkx1k about boot camps/self-taught versus traditional programs & I think this hit it on the head. One of the unanswered questions, and odd things about this industry (unlike say biotech) is that you tend to jump from one company to another (Jobs 2.0) – and it seems like that’s the model for the next decade or more. The real question I wonder then becomes where will web development as a career be for the next 20 – 40 years?

            So regarding the BS/MS in CS conundrum, so far I’ve seen two very attractive options: A) Georgia Tech’s online MOOC $7,000 Master’s program in CS, which is only 30 credits, and you don’t need a CS degree for undergrad (there are many master’s in CS programs that don’t need a BS in CS – something I wasn’t fully aware of until recently, and just require you to do foundational work) but the first class hasn’t graduated yet. See: http://www.omscs.gatech.edu/ and http://www.reddit.com/r/omscs 2 B) Oregon State’s Bachelor’s in CS which is all online can be done in 1 – 4 years (it’s a pos-bacc) and that costs like $30,000.

            At least for now, I’m working on Harvard’s CS50X which, from the general impression I’m getting, is the best intro to CS available (I looked into Udacity’s CS101, but wasn’t really feeling it), and I’m liking it a lot.

          • “but it shows you that it can be done, and that pedigree alone doesn’t matter as much as discipline, and work ethic” — yes, yes, yes. 500%.

            About imposter feeling being a common feeling — yes. Have you read this article yet? – http://davidwalsh.name/impostor-syndrome

            About where the industry is heading…things change so quickly, 40 years is like 400 years centuries ago. But I think as long as their are websites/web apps, there will be a demand for developers. However…how high will it be 20 years from now? Will all HS’s in the US actually start teaching programming? Who knows.

            As for me — I am the opposite of you haha. I do not see myself working for a big company. Maybe. But it’s not really an interest of mine.

            As far as formal CS programs versus informal: without a doubt an academic degree in CS has value. But…interestingly…I have had a few emails this last year from CS students, in college programs, who felt equipped to find jobs in the real world. The skills they had from their CS courses didn’t matchup to jobs they wanted. One girl for instance was much more interested in front-end languages and design than Java and algorithms and what not. I told her, though, that having a CS degree will make her standout…even if she’s interested in more design positions. I mean, she’s going to be getting a college degree no matter what, right? Might as well stick with CS. Sure it’s not easy…but IPO will make her or anyone way more marketable.

            I don’t have that option, sadly, for I am done with college and do not plan on heading back! Haha.

            I mean…I think if you were dead-set on working for company X, which basically requires employees to have a formal CS degree, than it’d be worth it.

            The Georgia Tech one seems most appealing to me. I really like their site, haha, and the price. I could see why you’d be hesitant since the first class hasn’t even finished yet…but…it is Georgia Tech. Not some random-never-heard-before online university.

          • Mood Shake

            > About imposter feeling being a common feeling — yes. Have you read this article yet? – http://davidwalsh.name/imposto

            That’s a nice article, haven’t read it before, and it definitely rings true – it’s also an industry with a lot of egos which probably adds fuel to the fire as well.

            > About where the industry is heading…things change so quickly, 40 years is like 400 years centuries ago. But I think as long as their are websites/web apps, there will be a demand for developers. However…how high will it be 20 years from now? Will all HS’s in the US actually start teaching programming? Who knows.

            I’m not too worried about HSs in the US filling the shortage anytime soon. IMO, education in the US fails at the secondary level – there is practically no emphasis on math and science, and our culture shuns behavior that is oriented towards that, but it’s gradually changing. Where the US excels, however, is at the university level & above, but it filters out most Americans. It’s partly/largely cultural based on social mores, and excessive leisure. The other problem I see with CS programs is that **not every one is that great.** Many CS programs produce graduates who either struggled with the theories, were never that interested in it, and/or went through some bad programs. On this notion, this is where I think some of the top programs in CS really do excel (but this doesn’t mean ivy league – there are some very excellent programs like North Carolina State which is kind of unheard of but is known for having very reputable Math/Data Science/CS programs).

            > As for me — I am the opposite of you haha. I do not see myself working for a big company. Maybe. But it’s not really an interest of mine.

            For me, it’s not so much having an “interest” in working for a big company – but the doors it can open in general and the different roles one can seg-way into (like upper management). The rule of thumb I was told was that you want to ideally get at least a big name on your resume (think FB, Google, Apple, Amazon, Salesforce, Microsoft) & then use it to help land other gigs, build your name in the industry, etc.. Often times, the competition can be fierce for these jobs, but the work often times mind numbingly dull. Start ups are nice because you may have more input, and say on the types of projects you work on, but I think the odds of making it big like with another FB, AirBnB, etc. are too slim. On the other hand, with bigger companies, there is stability, opportunity for advancement (say into management), company benefits, stock options, etc. Both have tangible pros/cons (and also the ability to telecommute/work around the world too even).

            > As far as formal CS programs versus informal: without a doubt an academic degree in CS has value. But…interestingly…I have had a few emails this last year from CS students, in college programs, who felt equipped to find jobs in the real world. The skills they had from their CS courses didn’t matchup to jobs they wanted. One girl for instance was much more interested in front-end languages and design than Java and algorithms and what not. I told her, though, that having a CS degree will make her standout…even if she’s interested in more design positions. I mean, she’s going to be getting a college degree no matter what, right? Might as well stick with CS. Sure it’s not easy…but IPO will make her or anyone way more marketable.

            Definitely – I like the idea of apprenticeships in general. College hammers too much theory and little practical experience, and I’ve read enough about CS graduates barely being able to code that it warrants attention. I mean if you look at the most well known companies, a lot of them were founded by college drop outs (Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg). Ironically, you don’t see these companies typically hiring non-CS graduates (whether it’s because non-CS “self-taught” types lack the skills/knowledge is another question)

            That said, I see the CS degree as something to get for the sake of getting, and proving one has the chops to handle the more complicated ideas in CS.

            > I don’t have that option, sadly, for I am done with college and do not plan on heading back! Haha.

            Hey, you never know! You may work for a few years, reach a plateau of sorts, and realize that you really like this, and want to learn more how everything works “under the hood” and you can better appreciate concepts like algorithms, or data structures compared to someone with no experience. Or taking into age where it’s probably easier to do something when the brain is purportedly more “plastic” and/or there are less work/family responsibilities. Or the industry starts shifting and you may find it difficult to break into certain fields that you may like (for me, I have an interest in Machine Learning and AI). In my opinion, while there will be plenty of jobs for the foreseeable future (though tech companies are pressuring Congress like hard to issue out H1Bs to Indian/Chinese immigrants to lower the wages being paid), I think we could reach some sort of climax around 2020 or so where there will be far more CS graduates (I think right now CS enrollment has skyrocketed over the last 4 – 5 years, because I know back in 2005 when I entered college, it wasn’t THAT popular) in the pool. Who knows though as no one has a crystal ball to predict the future.

            > The Georgia Tech one seems most appealing to me. I really like their site, haha, and the price. I could see why you’d be hesitant since the first class hasn’t even finished yet…but…it is Georgia Tech. Not some random-never-heard-before online university

            Yeah, the price is incredible. I’m strongly considering doing that as the idea of doing a part-time online master’s is appealing as I have no intention of taking time off for 2 years, and lost income potential. There’s Stanford’s SCPD Master’s in CS as well, which can be done online, but you have to work for an affiliate company (like Microsoft, Apple, Tesla, etc. etc.), a lot more expensive (about $50,000) and extremely difficult to get into. But word on the street is that a lot of these top master’s programs are money makers for schools, but having the name can help in the grand scheme of things.

          • I definitely see the value in working for a big company, or even medium-sized. And yes having Amazon or Microsoft or Google on your resume will open many doors. Connection-wise. And future job opps just from having that listed as experience.

            Back in college, studying CS or anything related to computers (IT, etc.) never even crossed my mind.

            But you’re right: who knows. Maybe one day I will want to go back to school to get some kind of advanced degree or certificate. I just can’t see it in the next 1-3 years. But, yes, as one ages, responsibilities increase. But I know many men and women who work and have families, etc, and still somehow go back to school. So, it’s possible without a doubt.

            I never heard of the Stanford program, but that’s interesting about working at an affiliate company. That could be a good experience. And if you liked the company, work their full-time following the program. A great foot in the door. So even though it is $$$, the connections alone could be worth it.

          • Mood Shake

            > But you’re right: who knows. Maybe one day I will want to go back to school to get some kind of advanced degree or certificate. I just can’t see it in the next 1-3 years. But, yes, as one ages, responsibilities increase. But I know many men and women who work and have families, etc, and still somehow go back to school. So, it’s possible without a doubt.

            I’ve gotten a lot of input from a lot of different students and schools. I think the average age for a lot of these programs is around 26 – 35, so if you’re not in that age bracket, you may have plenty of time assuming you’re fresh out of college graduate. I know when I graduated, I was fairly “burnt” out from program which was very rigorous, and going to school was the last thing on my mind.

            From what people have said, it’s doable to do a part-time program over 3 – 5 years doing it piecemeal which allows one to work a full time job, have a social life, and take one course or so a semester.

            Something I forgot to mention is that a lot of the times, employers will quite often cover the tab for the education which cuts down on costs too.

            > But you’re right: who knows. Maybe one day I will want to go back to school to get some kind of advanced degree or certificate. I just can’t see it in the next 1-3 years. But, yes, as one ages, responsibilities increase. But I know many men and women who work and have families, etc, and still somehow go back to school. So, it’s possible without a doubt.

            > I never heard of the Stanford program, but that’s interesting about working at an affiliate company. That could be a good experience. And if you liked the company, work their full-time following the program. A great foot in the door. So even though it is $$$, the connections alone could be worth it.

            Yes, absolutely. I’ve been looking between Stanford’s program (part time/online) versus Georgia Tech’s, and both are excellent top tier programs for name/knowledge gained. Interestingly enough if you ever wanted to, Georgia Tech announced fairly recently you can take all their graduate courses for free & you can check them out here: https://www.udacity.com/courses/georgia-tech-masters-in-cs

            Keep in mind the average age for this program is around 34, so you’ve got plenty of time to figure things out – I think it’s a good idea to work for a few/several years and see where things stand. You mentioned btw looking into a certificate – I know I’m personally looking/vested in SCPD’s “Foundations in Computer Science” Graduate certificate. Keep in mind it says graduate but you’re really just taking the intro courses/foundational courses. It’s pricey – but if you have an employer that covers some portion in tuition benefits then it can be quite often cheap and/or free. The benefits with this certificate are that 1) Stanford’s courses have a reputation of being more “user friendly” and “accessible” than schools like UC Berkeley, MIT, Johns Hopkins, etc. which are known for being cutthroat and ultra competitive. Mehran Sahami’s CS106A course, for instance, is rated at a level at or near Harvard CS50X’s (the different is that CS50X starts with C and even covers web development whereas CS106A covers Java). 2) The coursework will be extremely useful to learn in general (can be done working a full time job in a year or so) 3) It boosts your chances for getting into Stanford’s MS program & you can apply 18 units towards the 45 units requirement for their MS. So what’s a good specialization to do at Stanford? Check out: http://cs.stanford.edu/degrees/mscs/specializations/#MIC 4) If one can’t get into Stanford (even after reapplying), it serves as a good foundation for courses done through say Georgia Tech..

            Really good story as to why Stanford’s program is so amazing – http://qr.ae/fvCLb where Dror Mayden writes, “Upper division classes at Berkeley were nicer but more work. One class had two separate assignments that required working in the lab until 4 AM on the day following an all nighter. Tons of work but not busy work. We were building real systems and that’s what it takes to make them work.

            Now let’s switch to Stanford. One day I get a parking ticket for $14. I didn’t bother to pay it. A month later I get a threatening note that because I didn’t pay on time, the fine was now going to be $13.

            One of the first classes I took at Stanford gave two programming assignments the entire quarter. One was very easy and one was average, not even close to the Berkeley project. The following year, I shared an office with the TA of the Stanford class. The professor walked in and told the TA that students were evaluating his class as too hard, and the administrating told him that if he didn’t improve his evaluations, he would not get promoted from Associate to full Professor. Therefore, the professor was dropping the second assignment. I can’t imagine such a conversation in Berkeley.

            So, which is harder, Berkeley no doubt. Which is better, it really depends on what you need. Both have very smart students: at the top end the students are very similar, at the bottom end there are more such students at Berkeley. Both have great professors. Berkeley will try to break you, although mostly just in the first couple of years. If you make it through the hazing, Berkeley is a wonderful place that will challenge you like no place else and prepare you for the real world. If you don’t survive the hazing, and many don’t, you will drop out.

            Stanford will expose you to the best professors and the best students. You will make great connections. If you are self motivated, you will learn a lot. If you are not, you will coast through.”

          • Mood Shake

            > But 100% in agreement: when you pay for something, you value it more. The more you pay, the more you value it. If I were paying 2K for a bootcamp versus 15K — I’d bust my butt in the 15K one. Whereas with the former…may be more relaxed about completing it.

            The other thing is a lot of students are deterred by the cost. Don’t be if it’s a reputable, “top-tier” boot camp. The second thing is a lot of the programs are offering deferred payment of loans and typically requiring a small amount at first (like $2,000) or so, and then paying back once you get a job. It’s more or less the apprenticeship model which has been done for centuries, & it’s only recently (in the timespan of 40 or 50 or so years) where college is producing students that have little marketable skills. Too much theory, too little practical skills (and the same could be said conversely that too much practical skills and too little theory is detrimental too. )

          • yeah the latter method you mention — upfront payment, take % of salary later — is just like Viking Code School. I believe they also have special offers for students who recently finished college — which is nice. :)

  • infirmier

    I missed seeing Tealeaf Academy on your list, although thanks to your guide, I’m looking at Skillcrush’s course more seriously than ever (it’s just so super-affordable, you feel there has to be a catch.Can you really get a Jr. Rails developer job after their course or is it more like a One-Month Rails thing, a starting point to prepare you for other, more advanced courses, like Tealeaf or Bloc?).

    Also, if this “Epic Guide to Online Coding Bootcamps” becomes an annual thing, please can you take a look at the Modern Developer’s JavaScript career path courses next year? Thanks!

    • Hey —

      Tealeaf was one I wanted to include…but I couldn’t find a previous student to partake! If you know anyone who has done the course and would like to share their thoughts, please connect us =) I really wanted to include them!

      As for Learn Modern Development: I have never heard of them! Thanks for showing me the site. It looks awesome. The hardest part about this guide, without a doubt, was finding people to answer the questions!

      But I love your suggestion of doing it again next year, including new/missed bootcamps. I am marking it down in my calendar now to remind myself.

      • Taurus Omejia

        I am going trough Tealeaf myself right now. I just started course 1, and it’s been great! I am gonna see if I can get one of the previous Tealeaf grads to contact you. Most of the ones that have at least done the first 2 courses have landed jobs.

        • Hey Taurus,

          That’s so kind of you to offer! Thank you.

          I would consider either doing an update to this post..or maybe if there are enough ones left out that I can include, create a part 2.

          Will have to see how many come out of the woodwork =)

          Anyway the best way to reach me is directly: laurence@learntocodewith.me

          Thanks for reading!

          • Jessica Kobaliya

            Contact Jake Kaad, He went through the entire Tea Leaf Academy curriculum. He’s now a teacher at Epicodus.

          • …2 months later and I’m just seeing this…thanks for the heads up, Jessica :)

      • Sariah Masterson

        Albert Agram is a current TA at Tealeaf Academy, He’s located in Ghana. I’d be happy to connect you if that’d be helpful – not sure if you do anything with instructors, TAs, etc.
        https://gh.linkedin.com/in/alagram

        • Hey – yeah an instructor wouldn’t exactly count as a previous student!

          What I think I may do is another article like this one next year, and include ones I wasn’t able to snag + new online coding bootcamps (as I am sure new ones will emerge).

          So it would be like an updated 2016 version, or something!

          We’ll see :)

    • Chris Lee

      Judging by how well this turned out, we will probably participate in a future edition. Nice job to Laurence. In the meantime, if you google around for Tealeaf reviews, you’ll find a lot of posts from previous graduates. If you have any questions about Tealeaf, you can also reach out to us directly.

      • Thank you for reading, Chris =) Would have loved to have nine online intensive courses instead of eight!

  • melissa

    has anyone heard any more review of coder manual? i cant seem to find many reviews on the web and im thinking of doing either coder manual’s course or thinkful’s course. i have found quite a few reviews for thinkful but not coder manual.

    • Hey Melissa,

      I *think* Coder Manual is relatively new. (Meaning there may not be that many reviews online…yet.)

      Course Report (coursereport.com) is usually a good place to look for reviews.

      Also, if you have any questions you can surely email Coder Manual directly at info@codermanual.com =)

      Hope this helps!

  • sweetsting112

    I completed a Skillcrush blueprint, and I honestly couldn’t recommend it to anyone. There were huge holes in the curriculum, and the level of support they claim they provide just wasn’t there. I also don’t think it can be classified as an online boot camp, because the number of hours needed to complete the Skillcrush classes comes no where close to the amount of time people spend in other boot camps. I spent about an hour each weekday to complete the work, and that included time spent chasing down information to fill the gaps in the Skillcrush curriculum. It was always faster to search the web for answers than to wait for help from a Skillcrush instructor or teaching assistant (and sometimes they didn’t respond at all). It was all such a huge disappointment.

  • Ded Luis

    I suggest you remove the Coder Manual, I found the same guy on udemy with the same video on coder manual that is on udemy, the material is the same and on udemy it costs $10

    • Do you have the URL?

      • onlinedevschool.com will gladly take their place! contact me for all the text, images, student story, etc you need from us! You can reach me at (maggie.garcia.may) on gmail.

        A brief about us:
        Attending OnlineDevSchool is a personal experience. Instead of just a 45 minute meeting a week you attend a weekly mix of private 1 on 1 sessions with your Mentor, group and pair programming sessions with other students, and you have access to your Mentor in live chat (using Flowdock!) 4 days a week.

        The curriculum has two different branches, the front-end program where you will learn HTML5, CSS, and an in depth course of Javascript, and the back-end program, which focuses on server side and object oriented programming using SQL and Ruby and AJAX.

  • Sariah Masterson

    Disclaimer – I’m the Program Director at Coding Campus, but I wanted to note though that we offer our classes Online in real-time using the tool Zoom.us. We’ve been offering our Online option for almost a year now and have found it to be quite successful, not only for teaching students who live out of state and outside the U.S. but also for allowing those students to focus on job searching in their hometowns while taking the course — instead of starting their search when they get back. We pair our Online students with In-Person students for team projects and work with them one-on-one via Zoom.us’ screen control tools. — So ultimately, if a student wants both an immersive training experience and an Online option, our courses could meet that need. You can learn more at codingcamp.us.

    • Thanks for sharing!

      So just to make sure I understand – you basically have online versions of all your in-person classes, right ?

      If yes, you guys should definitely make that core evident on the site! I was looking around and it took me a few minutes to see the part about “online option” in the course description!

      I think it’s awesome that you do that – and should make it more visible :)

  • I really enjoyed this post. I’m a 2-time Bloc student, having completed both Bloc and iOS development. I highly recommend the process, to the extent that I now use bootcamps as training for my apprentices, after completing 3 months of of a curriculum that I create using treehouse, codeschool and those types of low cost resources.

    I’m now CTO of nuwe.co and also ower of getforge.com hammerformac.com

    • Oh wow that’s awesome!

      All three of the sites you shared look great!

      And I am super jealous because I want to build my own products like you have! (Maybe I need to re-prioritizing my life…)

      Anyway – great to see a former online coding bootcamp student building so much cool stuff.

  • Manuel Leiria

    Hello Laurence, I have a question. I have subscribed to Coder Manual, however, I’m a bit unsure as to what you can tell about it. You said you would not have posted it here if you knew it was an Udemy course. I’d like to understand why, or if you consider the course might be some kind of scam in what it claims. It was fairly cheap for me, but still, I can’t help but feel I’m not getting the full picture here.

    • I have not done the Coder Manual course so I can’t speak on it from a personal place BUT the reason why I would not have included it is because I do not consider Udemy courses to be
      “coding bootcamps”.

      To me, coding bootcamps (online ones, too) have a few things like:
      – mentorship (or live study groups)
      – better support (email, Q&As, Slack groups, etc.)
      – more in-depth and intensive learning rubric – usually a larger time commitment

      Maybe I am wrong, but I don’t think Udemy courses can offer those things..at least not the first two.

      **I don’t think the course is a scam.** It has high ratings on Udemy, afterall. I just wouldn’t classify it as a “bootcamp”.

      I hoe that clears things up.

      • Manuel Leiria

        Thanks for the reply.

        I have to say that so far I like the course’s structure. But the brutal discounts one can find for it and the way it’s discussed as being able to provide amazing skills in relative little time have turned a few flags on my head
        Also, the reviews seem to be mainly from people who still haven’t finished the course, and they seem mainly like over-hype.

        It might just be my cautiousness, but in the end it might really do turn out to be a proper gem. I’ll have to keep going and see.

        Proper bootcamps are something not to be found in Portugal, and the online prices are generally too high for our income levels. It’s unfortunate for now, but hopefully more and more services may show up.
        I’ve been thinking about subscription-based Code School or Treehouse. Although not being the focus of the article, what do you think about these models?

  • Laurence is awesome. When we need data about coding bootcamps, or her views about our competitors, we come to her website first!

  • Thomas Beaudry

    Signed up with “Treehouse” 7 months now, I’ve been learning their “Front-end web dev” class. JavaScript, Html, Css, Ajax and more, the biggest difference I’ve found that seperates them from the others are their “code challenges”, requiring student interaction & “problem solving” in order to advance. I find TH to be very inexpensive ($25 monthly) yet an awesome sourced “bootcamp”! Love your site, happy coding!

    • Hey Thomas! Happy to hear you are enjoying Treehouse. It is one of the best affordable options out there :)

      Take care and thank you for your kind words!! Yes – happy coding ^-^

      • Thomas Beaudry

        Hey Laurence, I really enjoy reading your articles! Approximately 8 months ago I was computer illiterate, since then I’ve learned a lot from numerous online bootcamps; Lynda, Treehouse, Udemy etc. Reading as many articles and related topics as possible. I currently developed several websites and even started tinkering around with game development on Unity (I’m not very good yet though lol)! My only regret is that I wish I started this 20 yrs ago! Any advice for a newbie in this cool but crazy world of 1s & 0s?? Keep posting more articles they rock, happy coding!!!

        • Thank you, Thomas! As far as advice goes, you have to join my FB group if you haven’t yet! (Newbiecoderwarehouse.com)

          It is a treasure trove of information. :)

          Good luck!